History

FIRST Robotics Competition in Florida

Orlando Regional signFIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) team SigmaC@TS,  who take their name from the “SIGMA” quality control program used by corporate sponsor Motorola, and the team’s Dillard school mascot, the Panther, kicked off the FIRST program in Florida in 1995. The team originally had to go to Boston to compete, since there were no competitions in Florida at that time.

Florida’s FRC program began in earnest in 1999 with 28 teams at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center. After four years of growth, the Regional Competition moved to the University Of Central Florida Arena in 2003 and has been held there ever since.

Managed by the nonprofit Florida FIRST Robotics Education Foundation (FFREF) , the Orlando Regional (formerly the Florida Regional) is among the oldest FRC events in the nation. In 2013, the event marked its 15th anniversary and hosted more than 60 teams, including teams from South America, and the Dominican Republic.

Team growth in 2011 was sufficiently large enough to warrant the addition of a second Regional event, with the South Florida Regional, in 2012.

A Look Back

Games change every year. Enjoy this look back over the last 19 years of Orlando Regional FIRST Robotics Competition games!

2017: FIRST STEAMWorks

FIRST-STEAMWORKS-RGB-h

The 2017 FIRST Robotics Competition steampunk themed game, invites two adventure clubs from an era in which technology relied on steam power to prepare their airships for the ultimate long distance race.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Photos-(coming soon) | Videos

2016: FIRST Stronghold

first-stronghold

In FIRST Stronghold, alliances of three robots are on a Quest to breach their opponents’fortifications, weaken their tower with boulders, and capture their tower.

 

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Photos- Set 1 – Set 2 | Videos

2015: Recycle Rush!

Recycle Rush logoRECYCLE RUSH! is a recycling-themed game played by two Alliances of three robots each. Robots score points by stacking totes on scoring platforms, capping those stacks with recycling containers, and properly disposing of pool noodles, representing litter.

 

 Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Photos- Set 1 – Set 2 | Videos

2014: Aerial Assist

AerialAssistThis game is played by two competing Alliances of three robots each on a flat 25’ x 54’ foot field, straddled by a truss suspended just over five feet above the floor. The objective is to score as many balls in goals as possible during a two (2)-minute and 30-second match. The more Alliances score their ball in their goals, and the more they work together to do it, the more points their Alliance receives.
 Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Photos | Videos

2013: Ultimate Ascent
2013UltimateAscentThis game is played by two competing alliances on a flat, 27 x 54 foot field. Each Alliance consists of three robots, and they compete to score as many discs into their goals as they can during a two (2)-minute and fifteen (15)-second match.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Videos

 

2012: Rebound Rumble

2012logoThis game is played between two Alliances of three teams each, who compete by scoring as many basketballs in the hoops as possible during the match. Balls scored in higher hoops score more points. Alliances are awarded bonus points if they are balanced on bridges at the end of the match. In matches where opponent Alliances work together to balance on the white bridge, all participating teams earn additional valuable seeding points.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards |  Videos |

2011: Logo Motion

2011logoIn this game, playing pieces are inner tubes shaped like the components of the FIRST logo. The objective is to place them on racks to gain points. In the endgame, robots deploy smaller FTC minibots to climb a tower. The game celebrates the 20th season of the FRC and is also meant to commemorate the artist Jack Kamen, who designed the original FIRST logo.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards | Videos |

2010: Breakaway

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In this game, announced on January 9, 2010, two alliances of three teams competed on a 27-by-54-foot field with bumps, attempting to earn points by collecting soccer balls in goals. Additional bonus points were earned for each robot suspended in air and not touching the field at the end of the match.

Robots directed soccer balls into goals, traverse “bumps” in the field, suspended themselves and each other on towers, and went through a tunnel located in the center of the field.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards  | Videos |

2009: Lunacy

2009logoThe name and features of the game honor the 40th anniversary of the first manned mission to the Moon. This is the first FRC competition to use the cRIO Mobile Device Controller control system from National Instruments. In this game, robots were designed to pick up 9″ game balls and score them in trailers hitched to their opponent’s robots for points. Additional points were awarded for scoring a special game ball, the Super Cell, in the opponents’ trailers.

Game Animation |Match Results | Awards | Videos |

2008: FIRST Overdrive

2010logoIn this game, student’s robots were designed to race around a track knocking down 40″ inflated Trackballs and moving them around the track, passing them either over or under a 6’6″ overpass. Extra points are scored by robots positioning the Trackballs back on the overpass before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

Game Animation | Match Results | Awards |  Videos

 

2007: Rack ‘n Roll

2007logoIn this game, student’s robots were designed to hang inflated colored tubes on pegs configured in rows and columns on a 10-foot high center rack structure. Extra points were scored by robots being in their home zone and lifting more than 4 inches off the floor by another robot before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

Game Animation | Match Results | Awards |  Videos

 

2006: Aim High

2006logoIn this game, the robots were designed to launch balls into goals while human players entered balls into play and scored points by throwing/pushing balls into corner goals. Extra points were scored by robots racing back to their end zones and climbing the ramp to the platform before the end of the two minute and 10 second match.

Game Animation | Match Results | Awards |  Videos

 

 

2005: Triple Play

2005logoTriple Play was the name of the 2005 season FIRST game. The game for the 2005 season was played on a 27′ wide by 52′ long playing field with the 9 goals configured in 3 x 3 matrix, similar to tic-tac-toe. The robots attempted to place the red and blue game tetras in or on one or more of the nine goals to score points and claim ownership of the goals.

Game Animation |  Match Results |  Awards | Videos

 

 

2004: FIRST Frenzy: Raising the Bar

2004logoRaising the Bar was the 2004 game for the FIRST Robotics Competition. The game for the 2004 season required robots to collect and pass 13 balls to the human player to then shoot them into fixed and moveable goals. There were three 30″ balls on the playing field that could be placed on top of any goal by a robot, which would double the point value in the goal. Toward the end of the match, robots would attempt to “hang” from a 10″ bar for additional points.

Game Animation | Match Results |  Awards | Videos

2003: Stack Attack

2003logoStack Attack was the game for the 2003 FIRST competition. The game required robots to collect and stack plastic storage containers on their side of the playing field. The location of the robots and containers and the height of the stacks at the end of the match determined each team’s score for the round.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards |  Videos

 

 

2002: Zone Zeal

2002logoEach two minute match began with the 24″ x 48″ field broken up into 5 zones. Four robots started on the playing field and were paired in alliances of two. There were two robots at diagonally opposite corners, 10 soccer balls in each driver station area, 20 soccer balls centered along each side of the field, and three moveable goals weighing  approximately 130 lbs each in the center zone. Robots raced around the playing field trying to gather balls, place them into goals, place the goals in their scoring zone, and return their robot to their starting zone before the two minutes elapsed.

Game Animation | Match Results |  Videos

2001: Diabolical Dynamics

2001logoDiabolical Dynamics was the 2001 game for the FIRST Robotics Competition. Four teams worked together as one alliance trying to achieve the highest possible score in each match. Points were scored by placing balls in their goal, and by positioning their robots and goals in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of each match, the alliance station contained twenty small balls. In addition, there were twenty small balls and four large balls on the far side of the field which could also be used to score points.

Game Animation | Match Results | Awards |  Videos

2000: Co-Opertition FIRST

2000logoCo-Opertition FIRST was the 2000 game for the FIRST Robotics competition. Four teams, paired in two alliances, competed in each match. An alliance scored points by placing balls in their goal and by positioning their robots in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of a match each alliance had seven yellow balls and one black ball in their station. There were also fifteen yellow balls and two black balls on the far side of the field which could be used by either alliance to score points.

Game Animation | Match Results | Awards | Videos

1999: Double Trouble

1999logoAt the start of each match, each human player station contains three of the alliance’s floppies. Four floppies per alliance are located on the playing field. Alliances receive one point for each of their floppies that are over the playing field, not in contact with the surface of the playing field, and less than 8 feet above the surface of the playing field.

Floppies that are 8 feet or more above the playing field earn 3 points for the alliance it belongs to. Any robot on the puck multiplies its alliance’s score by 3. If a puck is entirely on one side of the dividing line that runs through the middle of the field, the alliance whose robot operator stations are furthest from the puck will multiply its score by 2.

Game Animation |  Match Results | Awards |  Videos